The clues and crumbs that make up a satisfactory mid-point climax

I’ve taken a little break over the last few days from blogging and social media in general. I’m at a place in my manuscript that has given me a lot of grief recently; my mid-point. This might not be a big deal to all writers, it depends on the story. I don’t want to give away spoilers, but my story in particular, has a pretty important mid-point.

There are stories that have a slow build-up to the climax at the end, and then there are stories that have like a “lesser” climax in the middle. I’m quite fond of both versions. Like I said, it depends on the story. As a writer, no matter the path we choose there’s pressure in one way or another to get it just right.

Personally, I like stories that leave little breadcrumbs for the reader. Sometimes, these crumbs are noticeable and help the reader figure out part of the mystery before the great reveal, but other times, the crumbs are completely invisible if you don’t already know what they mean and where they lead.

Growing up, I loved reading the Harry Potter books. I read and re-read them as often as I could, and every time, I found new things that I hadn’t noticed before. It could be a tiny detail that didn’t really make much of a difference, but the fact that it was there made me feel like I was experiencing the story in a new way. J.K. Rowling is a master at crafting breadcrumbs. Everything is connected, and even if it doesn’t appear that way at first, you can find the connection several books later.

So how did I get from mid-points to… well, here? I suppose it’s because I try to learn from Rowlings’ expertise on this subject, and apply it to my own writing to the best of my ability. That is why I think the mid-point is so important – because that is where the clues will lead (as well as the end, of course, but we’ll get to that later). There’s a fine line between making it too obvious and making it too… out of nowhere. As writers, we shouldn’t underestimate nor overestimate the reader. I suppose the only way to learn this is by experience, by letting other people read our work and get feedback.

Naturally, every single chapter of a novel is important in its own way. If it’s not, then it shouldn’t be there. But I think the three most important ones are the beginning, the middle and the end. Writing these always brings some added pressure, because for some reason, long after we’re done reading, we tend to remember these the best.